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Why You Need To STOP Using Your Homemade Laundry Soap

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In a day where we are constantly surrounded by harmful chemicals, it’s only natural to try and stay away from them as best we can. Normally, when you think of an “all natural” product (like laundry soap) you may associate it with being more expensive ($$$). This may send you running, OR motivate you to find an “all natural” but also cost effective alternative.

If this sounds like you, keep reading because this is exactly how I felt. And also my reason for searching out an “all natural” and homemade laundry soap/detergent.

In my journey to ridding my home of harmful chemicals, naturally, the obstacle of finding a safe laundry detergent that didn’t break the bank was bound to surface.

I spent hours researching which one’s worked, which one’s didn’t. How to get the most bang for my buck, etc.

Upon my research, I found one. It seemed so promising. I made it into pods, it took hardly any time at all and the best part? It cost me $15 for what was going to last me over 9-12 months!! WOW!

Sounds great, right?

It was. I tried it out, not expecting great results and I was super impressed! My clothes went in dirty and came out clean!

Or so I thought.

A friend of mine kindly offered some advice about my homemade laundry soap. She told me to research a little bit more into if my clothes were actually getting clean. I stumbled upon this website, with LOTS of helpful research about laundry and the SCIENCE behind it.

Check out the pictures of “clean” laundry (washed with homemade soap for a while) that had been stripped, the water is disgusting! So obviously it was not actually getting clean. It just looked clean(er)

So back to the drawing board I went. I decided to throw the cost obstacle aside and instead focus on first getting rid of the harmful chemicals in our laundry routine.

Little did I know, my laundry holy grail was right under my nose! Thieves! Thieves have a laundry detergent! (Thieves is a product from Young Living, Essential oils. If you would like to learn more about essential oils click here.)

Before I decided to buy it, I wanted to make sure it would live up to my standards. So I compared Thieves to Tide (what I normally would use) and also checked if any of the ingredients were on the “Dirty Dozen” List:

Dirty Dozen:

1. BHA and BHT

Used mainly in moisturizers and makeup as preservatives. Suspected endocrine disruptors and may cause cancer (BHA). Harmful to fish and other wildlife.

2. Coal tar dyes: p-phenylenediamine and colours listed as “CI” followed by a five digit number

In addition to coal tar dyes, natural and inorganic pigments used in cosmetics are also assigned Colour Index numbers (in the 75000 and 77000 series, respectively).

Look for p-phenylenediamine hair dyes and in other products colours listed as “CI” followed by five digits.1 The U.S. colour name may also be listed (e.g. “FD&C Blue No. 1” or “Blue 1”). Potential to cause cancer and may be contaminated with heavy metals toxic to the brain.

3. DEA-related ingredients

Get the sustainable shopper’s guide to cosmeticsUsed in creamy and foaming products, such as moisturizers and shampoos. Can react to form nitrosamines, which may cause cancer. Harmful to fish and other wildlife. Look also for related chemicals MEA and TEA.

4. Dibutyl phthalate

Used as a plasticizer in some nail care products. Suspected endocrine disrupter and reproductive toxicant. Harmful to fish and other wildlife.

5. Formaldehyde-releasing preservatives

Look for DMDM Hydantoin, Diazolidinyl Urea, imidazolidinyl urea, methenamine, and quarternium-15. Used in a variety of cosmetics. Slowly release small amounts of formaldehyde, which causes cancer.

6. Parabens

Used in a variety of cosmetics as preservatives. Suspected endocrine disruptors and may interfere with male reproductive functions.

7. Parfum (a.k.a. fragrance)

Any mixture of fragrance ingredients used in a variety of cosmetics — even in some products marketed as “unscented.” Some fragrance ingredients can trigger allergies and asthma. Some linked to cancer and neurotoxicity. Some harmful to fish and other wildlife.

8. PEG compounds

Used in many cosmetic cream bases. Can be contaminated with 1,4-dioxane, which may cause cancer. Also for related chemical propylene glycol and other ingredients with the letters “eth” (e.g., polyethylene glycol).

9. Petrolatum

Used in some hair products for shine and as a moisture barrier in some lip balms, lipsticks, and moisturizers. A petroleum product that can be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which may cause cancer.

10. Siloxanes

Look for ingredients ending in “-siloxane” or “-methionine.” Used in a variety of cosmetics to soften, smooth and moisten. Suspected endocrine disrupter and reproductive toxicant (cyclo tetrasiloxane). Harmful to fish and other wildlife.

11. Sodium Laureth Sulfate

Used in foaming cosmetics, such as shampoos, cleansers and bubble bath. Can be contaminated with 1,4-dioxane, which may cause cancer. Look also for related chemical sodium lauryl sulfate and other ingredients with the letters “eth” (e.g., sodium Laureth Sulfate).

12. Triclosan

Used in antibacterial cosmetics, such as toothpaste, cleansers, and antiperspirants. Suspected endocrine disrupter and may contribute to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Harmful to fish and other wildlife.


I am slowly switching my entire home to cleaner ingredients, and it’s making me feel 1000% better about the future of my health and my kids’ health. So, as you can see, Tide is obviously cheaper, at the cost of your health. If you use another detergent and would like me to compare them to thieves, leave a comment below!

If you can limit the number of toxins that enter your body every day, why wouldn’t you??

What would you like me to review NEXT?

Let me know below!

Member # : 10752888

Disclosure:

I am not a doctor or a scientist, the information above is from my own research. Please do your own research before making any kind of decision or judgment.

This Post may contain affiliate links.

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